Posts tagged #Rims

Custom Made Wooden Rims.

Over the last year we have been working on a couple of unusual projects. We have mentioned before the Bamboo bike frame that was completed recently, which we will feature here before too long, as a follow on to the frame project however we have a set of wooden rimed wheels.

These things are beautiful, we have dealt before with an Italian rim manufacturer, Ghisallo, but these new rims that a good friend of ours has had custom made are head and shoulders better. Our friend Tom, who has been the driving force behind the bamboo frame build, went in search of a craftsman to make these hoops and boy did he find one. They are made of white oak and have been stained and finished in a lovely medium brown that shows the grain.
The unfinished rim
 
The rim after being stained and laced up.

We used the Velo Orange Grand Cru front hub.Just visible are the DT Swiss brass spoke washers that we use.
The finished wheel.
The wheels will end up on the bamboo bike frame, at the moment though, they are hanging up in the workshop and have become quite the conversation starter...



Check the Pads



Tis the season to pay special attention to your brake pads, wet conditions are notorious for embedding grit and debris into your brake pads, I am sure you have all heard that long shoooshing noise the first time you apply your brakes after riding through a wet section or a puddle, that is the sound of grit being sandwiched between your pad and rim. What happens next is a lot of that debris gets pushed into the rubber of your pads and from then on gets applied to your rim every time you brake. Now, what also begins to happen is that little pieces of your rim get chiseled off and they end up in your pads as well. It becomes a vicious circle.
                You should keep an eye on the condition of your brake pads throughout the year but especially after wet or very dusty rides. Keeping the pads free from debris makes a big difference to your rims wellbeing.
                If you do see some grit and rim material in the pads the easiest way to remove it is by buffing the surface of the pads until you reach new rubber, free from the junk. Use 80 grit emery-cloth on a small block, if you just use the cloth on your finger you will place a concave profile on the pad. Do not use sand paper for wood, that stuff will put more grit in than it takes out.
               Also periodically check the rims for digs or rough spots caused by contaminated pads. Any rim trouble spots can be addressed by carefully using a 120 grit cloth. If in doubt come see your friendly bike mechanic.
Before; A road pad (top) and a mountain pad (below), both with rim material embedded
After; Same road pad after some buffing. Good as new.

Posted on October 28, 2012 .

Re-Inventing the Wheel.



The bike business is a business like many others, ideas come and ideas go, some good some bad and many are just there to let people know that the company ain’t dead. Every once in a while an idea comes along and just kind of hangs in the periphery, just waiting for their time to come. One such idea is 650b wheels, not that the 650b wheel is a new idea, hell it’s not even an old idea it has been around for decades, but to mountain bike designers and riders it is relatively new. There are some people, and I myself am one, that contend that if we had designed mountain bikes from the ground up in the beginning instead of modifying road bikes and cruisers to go biking in the woods, we would probably have opted for 650b wheels right from the start, however modifying frames led us to the smaller 26 inch wheels that then became the mountain bike standard for so many years.
        A few years ago we made the quantum leap to the 700c wheel, more commonly referred to as the 29er, which has made a huge impact with off roaders. This has made it difficult for the 650b though. Going so long with one choice, the 26, then adding the 29er quite recently has meant some reluctance from mass manufactures to add yet another wheel size and different bike geometry to already swollen product lines. Luckily the fear of being left behind by the competition has won out and we are seeing many choices from frame companies along with tire and rim manufacturers for 650b. This is very good news. And here's why; Choices.
As mentioned before the industry standard 26inch wheel MTB has been around since the start of mountain biking, the 29er or 700c MTB wheel is a relative newcomer and the 650 b is the new kid in town. The important thing to keep in mind here though is to not disregard any of the old wheel sizes just because there is a new one. They all have their place when looking for a new bike.
During this bike season we have seen a lot of new customers, which is very nice, a lot of new MTB’ers have come through the door as well and a good deal of them have opted for the 29er. Now don't get me wrong a 29er is a fantastic machine but it is not for everybody.
Designing frames and frame geometry for big wheels is tough, sure anyone can build a bike to accept big wheels but getting the handling and feel dialed in is a very different matter and it is especially difficult getting it right on mid to small frame sizes. We have seen many, many riders lately that look like they have been swallowed whole by their bike and, while this arrangement is fine for a gentle trail ride, on a more MTB specific trail or good single-track it must be akin to riding a bull elephant with colic.
Before I carry on let me clarify what we actually mean when we talk about these different sizes. Below are the measurements, in millimeters across the wheel, bead to bead. The bead of a rim is about 3mm down from the top of the rim.

26        559mm
650b    584mm
29er     622mm

As you can see the 650 falls about midway between the other two you will also note that the bead seat diameter of the 29er is the same as a standard road 700c so why do we call it a 29er when it is really only a modern 27inch road wheel. Well it is because some bright spark decided to measure the diameter outside to outside with a fully inflated mtb tire on, which gives you a measurement of roughly 29inches. Confused yet?
Anyway, back to the business at hand.  If you are a tallish or leggy person the big wheel option is definitely a choice for you. The frame size will be plenty to accommodate the extra clearance while still maintaining the ride characteristics of a good mtb. All the rules of bottom bracket height and head and seat tube angles still need to be obeyed and they can be with a mid to large frame size. However, if you are, shall we say a little vertically challenged, this is where problems arise. The rules of designing a bike to perform well for the rider tend to get thrown out the window and it all becomes about designing a small enough frame to at least reach the pedals on while the design is sacrificed to fit a big set of wheels. This really does not work. The cut off for a bike designed for the rider instead of the wheels generally falls somewhere around the 5’6” mark. There are exceptions for those with exceedingly long legs in relation to body height but generally speaking this is where sticking with the 26” wheels tends to be the better option.  Now though we have another option 650b.  This is where the slightly smaller size gives us, as frame designers, much more scope to still design the bike for the ultimate ride and handling but still giving the option of bigger wheels.
A Soma "B-Side" Built and ready to roll.
For those wanting to know more about the options available in the 650 or 29er range stop in or fire me an email. There are lots of choices. At the moment some of the best 650b frames tend to be from companies like Soma who offer the B-side. I expect some of the major names to start producing complete 650 bikes in the next year’s product line.
Posted on September 23, 2012 .

Wheel of the Week




A customer with very good taste and a lot of patience finally received his reward today. The new Chris King R45 road hub with the Campy freehub body hit the store, after a long wait, last week and was coupled with a Velocity' Fusion' rim, DT Competition spokes in black and DT brass nipples. The fire red hub added the required splash of color. The newborn hit the scales at a very respectable 918grams and is this particular customer’s third one of my hand- built wheels.
Posted on September 7, 2012 .

Velocity Tubeless Road.


The good folks at Velocity have produced some great rims over the years and anyone that I have talked wheels to knows that I am a big fan. A little while ago there was a bit of a re think in the way road tires performed best, the general consensus was that a road tire of 700x23 performed best when mounted on a rim of around 19mm wide however the footprint of a 23 tire seems to favor a rim that is a little wider. The Velocity A23 is a good example and now we can mount it tubeless.  The tubeless system is very similar to the Stan’s mtb method. A special rim tape is used and a tubeless valve mounted in the rim finishes the job. You can use any sealant in there for added security, the Stan’s is good but we prefer the Caffe Latex brand. Once mounted this setup will give you as close to the ride of a tubular wheel as you can get without getting out the glue!
www.Velocityusa.com

Posted on August 26, 2012 .

Velocity Rims and Hubs


I have been building wheels for many years now and over those years I have used rims, spokes and hubs from every manufacturer that has produced them, from Mavic to Zipp, Wheelsmith to Sapim and Chris King to DT.Swiss. Some of these companies have remained favorites, others, not so much and some have just plain priced themselves out of the market.       
One company though has remained a constant favorite here at Cycle Depot, Velocity. This little Australian company has never disappointed, offering a superb product, whether it be hub or rim, at a good price. I use more Deep V rims from Velocity per year than all the other brands combined and, out of all the wheels I build, close to 80% of them have a Velocity Hub or rim. Now there is more good news. Apparently I am not alone in my affection for all things Velocity. It seems a good many wheel builders feel the same way, so much so that America has become the largest market for their product and, to meet that demand in a more timely fashion, Velocity has just recently brought their manufacturing facility to the U.S., Florida to be precise.
So instead of the 'made in Australia' stickers they will now sport ‘made in the U.S.A.’ This will also help with the price, as shipping from the land down under is not cheap. While I do not expect the products to go down in price, I do not expect them to go up either.
Check them out at; www.Velocityusa.com
Posted on August 21, 2012 .